Thank you Volunteers!

Thank you Volunteers!

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All of us at The Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation had a great time at our volunteer appreciation dinner at Round Table Pizza on Thursday night! Our volunteers play a very important part in our restoration efforts, and we wanted to show them how thankful we are.

Our top volunteers this year were Jane Reed, Marty Oberlander, Loyd Evans, and Mae Harms!

Without those who sacrifice their time to join us in the forest restoring and protecting sensitive habitats, our jobs would be much harder. We hope you can join us at a volunteer event during our 2017/2018 restoration season!

Another great day in the forest!

Another great day in the forest!

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We had an excellent volunteer restoration day last Wednesday – the last one with Jessy and Caleb as our AmeriCorps members! Our new members will start November 1st!

We worked on a site that would have taken the restoration team alone several days to complete, but with the help of our awesome volunteers we got the majority of it done in just a few hours! As always, they exceeded our expectations and got the rills filled and most of the route duffed in record time.

Thank you to everyone who came out to work with us on Wednesday and throughout the year!

One day, two sites!

One day, two sites!

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The CSNC crew and volunteers headed out to Omo Ranch today to shut down and restore two unauthorized OHV trails in the Eldorado National Forest.

Despite the heat, everyone really worked hard to get these sites done!

In addition to the main large woody debris exclusions at the entrances to both sites, our volunteers helped cover bare ground with duff and throw debris on the tracks to make them even less accessible.
Thanks to our awesome volunteers, we got the restoration done in record time and were able to head over to the creek to cool off at the end of the day!

CSNC will be holding another volunteer watershed restoration work day on Wednesday, September 6th. If you couldn’t make it out with us today, we hope you can join us next time!

Free Pizza!

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The Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation will be hosting a PIZZA PARTY for our volunteers on Thursday, September 14th!

If you’ve volunteered with us this year, join us for free pizza and fun! If you haven’t had a chance to make it our for one of our volunteer days, it’s not too late! Join us Thursday, August 17th for a volunteer watershed restoration work day.

The CSNC crew and volunteers headed out to Omo Ranch on Wednesday to restore an illegal OHV route crossing an ephemeral stream in sensitive habitat. Our volunteers stepped up to help us install waterbars and cover the route with duff and debris. Despite all our hard work, there is still more to be done here! Join us next week as we return to complete restoration work at this site. This is your chance to be invited to our pizza party!


If you’d like to volunteer with us but none of our scheduled volunteer days have worked out for you, contact Jessy at jessy@sierranevadaconservation.org. We may be able to arrange a time for you to join us in the field based on your schedule. We hope you can join us soon!

 

Our work at Sopiago continues!

Our work at Sopiago continues!

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The CSNC crew and volunteers continued restoration work at Sopiago Creek today, shutting down an illegal hill climb route. Along with previously placed exclusions and waterbars, we filled the rills and duffed and disguised the route. 

Our volunteers always exceed our expectations, but today they really dominated the duffing! We got our site done more quickly than we thought possible and were able to have a nice long lunch cooling of by the creek.

A big thank you to all those who came to Sopiago today! We still have more work to do in the area and can use all the help we can get! If you couldn’t make it out this time, we hope you can join us for our next restoration day!

Organizing to Protect our Public Lands

Organizing to Protect our Public Lands

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ORGANIZING TO PROTECT OUR PUBLIC LANDS


 

A workshop w/ the Center for Biological Diversity

Thursday, July 20th – 7pm to 9pm

Cameron Park Community Center (Social Room)
2502 Country Club Drive, Cameron Park

Organizing to Protect Our Public Lands

A workshop w/ the Center for Biological Diversity
“It is an American right to roam in our public lands. The people of the United States, today and tomorrow, share equally in the ownership of these majestic places. This powerful idea transcends party lines and sets our country apart from the rest of the world. That is why we strongly oppose any proposal, current or future, that devalues or compromises the integrity of our national public lands.”
From a Press Release by REI – February 2017

 

Public lands – our National Forests, Monuments, Parks and more – are under siege by a growing number of political and economic interests. These powerful forces wish to eliminate existing environmental protections and sell off these publicly owned lands to the highest bidder.

Without an organized and effective opposition to these efforts, the threats may become a sobering reality. And if we wait too long, it will be too late to mount an effective resistance.

The Center for Biological Diversity has pinpointed a number of Congressional Districts around the country whose representatives have aligned themselves with the “public lands seizures” movement. Our own Dist 4’s rep, Tom McClintock (R) ranks as #14 on the “Public Land Enemies” list compiled by the Center.

Ryan Beam, Public Lands Campaigner for the Center for Biological Diversity, is coming to El Dorado County to conduct a workshop on how we can organize effective opposition to protect and defend our public lands (he’ll also be in Sonora/Jackson the following Monday, July 24th):

  • America’s Public Lands – what are they and why should we care?
  • What is the “public land seizure” movement and who are its members and political/corporate allies?
  • What is McClintock’s role and what bills are being introduced on the Federal level to take away our public lands?
  • How do we organize to oppose these threats and protect our public lands for generations to come?

Almost 50% of the lands in El Dorado County are public lands! We live in the heart of a region with tens of thousands of residents who depend on public lands for recreation, livelihood, scientific research and study, and general enjoyment of living within and next to thriving public lands and habitat, replete with both our native flora and fauna.

If we can mobilize around the defense of everyone’s right to use and enjoy these lands (and not solely for the profit of corporations), we will be able to protect these lands for future generations, and make a significant impact on what happens (or doesn’t happen) on these lands.

This is not a “Red” or “Blue” issue; this is an issue for all us who enjoy and live near these precious national and natural treasures, treasures of untold floral and faunal riches.

This is too important a moment to ignore. The threats are real, the stakes too high.

This two-hour workshop is free. Organizing to Protect Our Public Lands Workshop is at the Cameron Park Community Center, 2502 Country Club Drive in Cameron Park, Thursday, July 20th, 7pm to 9pm. We ask that you pre-register to ensure we have sufficient space for all those who wish to attend.

For registration or questions: publiclandsworkshop@gmail.com or call 530-748-9365.


This event is being co-sponsored by the Center for Biological Diversity, El Dorado Progressives, and the El Dorado Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

All photos: (c) 2017 Tripp Mikich
Top to Bottom: Indian Valley, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; South Fork of the American River, Coloma; Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; Granite Chief Wilderness, Tahoe National Forest.

Beautiful flowers, hard work, and a great restoration day!

Beautiful flowers, hard work, and a great restoration day!

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We had a small but strong volunteer crew come out for our restoration day at Sopiago last Thursday. We installed water bars, filled rills, and disguised an unauthorized route that was delivering sediment into Sopiago Creek. There was some lovely vegetation along the trail that will hopefully grow in over the trail, helping to decompact the soil, now that traffic has been blocked off.

A rotting log is great for soil genesis to encourage vegetation growth!
Caleb checking out a gorgeous foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)

These plants included azaleas, lupines, and foxgloves, all of which were beautifully blooming! The gooseberry bushes are starting to fruit, and we even spotted a couple wild strawberries!

A big thank you to those who came out to help us work on restoring this lovely area! If you couldn’t make it this time, we hope you’ll be able to join us on Wednesday, June 21st for our next restoration day!

 

Special thanks to Jane for making these delicious end of the day treats!
An Excellent Day of Restoration Near Sopiago Creek!

An Excellent Day of Restoration Near Sopiago Creek!

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The CSNC restoration team and eight volunteers, ranging in age from 12 to mid-70s, headed out to Amador Ranger District on Saturday to restore an illegal hill climb route near Sopiago Creek.

Before
After

As part of a large local network of non-system trails, the track was contributing a significant amount of sediment to Sopiago Creek.

With the help of our hardworking volunteers, we were able to begin to stop this erosion by filling in the rills, covering bare ground, and disguising the trail to improve habitat for plants and animals on land and in the creek. We didn’t see any Western Pond Turtles, a vulnerable species that can be found in the area, but we did see a little sharp-tailed snake! A big thank you to everyone who came out with us!
We had a fantastic day working and enjoying the forest. We even got to eat our lunches and cool off by the creek!

CSNC’s New Resource Damage Reporting Form

CSNC’s New Resource Damage Reporting Form

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As spring turns into summer, forest roads are re-opened. Add a new dimension to your explorations and participate in the improvement of watershed health by reporting damage from vehicles off designated routes.
Using CSNC’s reporting portal, you can tell us a little about it, attach some photos of the damage, and plot it on our map.

Use this link to access our reporting form. You can also find it in the Get Involved section on our main page under “Report Resource Damage.” CSNC’s restoration crew will check it out and do appropriate repairs. Thank you for your contribution to restoring the Eldorado National Forest!

Interior Department Releases List of Monuments Under Review, Announces First-Ever Formal Public Comment Period for Antiquities Act Monuments

Interior Department Releases List of Monuments Under Review, Announces First-Ever Formal Public Comment Period for Antiquities Act Monuments

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Date: May 5, 2017
Contacts: Interior_Press@ios.doi.gov

Interior Department Releases List of Monuments Under Review, Announces First-Ever Formal Public Comment Period for Antiquities Act Monuments

WASHINGTON – The Department of the Interior today announced the first ever formal public comment period for members of the public to officially weigh in on monument designations under the Antiquities Act of 1906, and the Department released a list of monuments under review under the President’s Executive Order 13792, issued April 26, 2017. A public comment period is not required for monument designations under the Antiquities Act; however, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke and President Trump both strongly believe that local input is a critical component of federal land management.

Comments may be submitted online after May 12 at http://www.regulations.gov by entering “DOI-2017-0002” in the Search bar and clicking “Search,” or by mail to Monument Review, MS-1530, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1849 C Street NW, Washington, DC 20240.

DATES: The Department will shortly publish a notice in the Federal Register officially opening the public comment period. Written comments relating to the Bears Ears National Monument must be submitted within 15 days of publication of that notice. Written comments relating to all other designations subject to Executive Order 13792 must be submitted within 60 days of that date.

“The Department of the Interior is the steward of America’s greatest treasures and the manager of one-fifth of our land. Part of being a good steward is being a good neighbor and listening to the American people who we represent,” said Secretary Zinke. “Today’s action, initiating a formal public comment process finally gives a voice to local communities and states when it comes to Antiquities Act monument designations. There is no pre-determined outcome on any monument. I look forward to hearing from and engaging with local communities and stakeholders as this process continues.”

Executive Order 13792 of April 26, 2017 (82 FR 20429, May 1, 2017), directs the Secretary of the Interior to review certain National Monuments designated or expanded under the Antiquities Act of 1906, 54 U.S.C. 320301-320303 (Act). Specifically, Section 2 of the Executive Order directs the Secretary to conduct a review of all Presidential designations or expansions of designations under the Antiquities Act made since January 1, 1996, where the designation covers more than 100,000 acres, where the designation after expansion covers more than 100,000 acres, or where the Secretary determines that the designation or expansion was made without adequate public outreach and coordination with relevant stakeholders, to determine whether each designation or expansion conforms to the policy set forth in section 1 of the order. Among other provisions, Section 1 states that designations should reflect the Act’s “requirements and original objectives” and “appropriately balance the protection of landmarks, structures, and objects against the appropriate use of Federal lands and the effects on surrounding lands and communities.” 82 FR 20429 (May 1, 2017).

In making the requisite determinations, the Secretary is directed to consider:

(i) the requirements and original objectives of the Act, including the Act’s requirement that reservations of land not exceed “the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the objects to be protected”;

(ii) whether designated lands are appropriately classified under the Act as “historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, [or] other objects of historic or scientific interest”;

(iii) the effects of a designation on the available uses of designated Federal lands, including consideration of the multiple-use policy of section 102(a)(7) of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (43 U.S.C. 1701(a)(7)), as well as the effects on the available uses of Federal lands beyond the monument boundaries;

(iv) the effects of a designation on the use and enjoyment of non-Federal lands within or beyond monument boundaries;

(v) concerns of State, tribal, and local governments affected by a designation, including the economic development and fiscal condition of affected States, tribes, and localities;

(vi) the availability of Federal resources to properly manage designated areas; and

(vii) such other factors as the Secretary deems appropriate.

82 FR 20429-20430 (May 1, 2017).

The National Monuments being initially reviewed are listed in the following tables:

NATIONAL MONUMENTS BEING INITIALLY REVIEWED PURSUANT TO CRITERIA IN EXECUTIVE ORDER 13792

NATIONAL MONUMENTS BEING REVIEWED TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE DESIGNATION OR EXPANSION WAS MADE WITHOUT ADEQUATE PUBLIC OUTREACH AND COORDINATION WITH RELEVANT STAKEHOLDERS


The Department of the Interior seeks public comments related to: (1) Whether national monuments in addition to those listed above should be reviewed because they were designated or expanded after January 1, 1996 “without adequate public outreach and coordination with relevant stakeholders;” and (2) the application of factors (i) through (vii) set forth above to the listed national monuments or to other Presidential designations or expansions of designations meeting the criteria of the Executive Order. With respect to factor (vii), comments should address other factors the Secretary might consider for this review.

In a separate but related process, certain Marine National Monuments will also be reviewed. As directed by section 4 of Executive Order 13795 of April 28, 2017, “Implementing An America-First Offshore Energy Strategy” (82 FR 20815, May 3, 2017), the Department of Commerce will lead the review of the Marine National Monuments in consultation with the Secretary of the Interior. To assist in that consultation, the Secretary will accept comments related to the application of factors (i) through (vii) in Executive

Order 13792 as set forth above to the following Marine National Monuments:

MARINE NATIONAL MONUMENTS BEING REVIEWED PURSUANT TO EXECUTIVE ORDERS 13795 AND 13792