Bottlehill Volunteer Event!

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Another Successful Volunteer Event is on the books! On February 7th, six volunteers helped restore an unauthorized  OHV route in the Bottlehill area of the Georegtown District. This group restored an impressive 0.5 acres! We had so much fun and great company.  Our next Volunteer Event will be Thursday February 22nd in Mosquito.  You can meet us at the Placerville Raley’s  to leave at 9am or  the intersection of 193 and Rock Creek Road

Email kaitlin@sierranevadaconservation.org to RSVP!

Public invited to Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation Open House to discuss Off-Highway Vehicle grant application

Public invited to Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation Open House to discuss Off-Highway Vehicle grant application

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The Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation (CSNC) will be submitting an application for Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Funds for the upcoming 2017/2018 grant cycle. CSNC is developing a preliminary application to the Off Highway Motor Vehicle Recreation (OHMVR) Division for a Restoration grant. CSNC’s continued partnership with El Dorado National Forest will focus on restoring unauthorized OHV routes that negatively impact sensitive resources in the Forest. Funding will help support our restoration crew and volunteers, and defray equipment, vehicle and tool costs.

The Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation has been successful in previous OHV applications. The grants have helped identify 770 sites throughout El Dorado National Forest that are in need of restoration. Of those 770, 342 sites have already been restored using OHV grant funding and volunteers. These sites have helped protect sensitive resources such as archaeology, sensitive plants, streams/creeks, and wildlife such as the Western pond turtle and Sierra Nevada yellow legged frog.

Public input is important for our proposal’s success, and CSNC will be hosting an Open House on February 9 from 3:00pm to 5:00pm to discuss the grant application. This Open House will be held at the CSNC Office, 681 Main Street, Suite 217, Placerville, CA 95667.

Once completed, the preliminary grant applications will be available on the OHMVR website on Tuesday, March 6, 2018 through Monday, April 2, 2018 for review and comment. To review the grant applications submitted go to http://olga.ohv.parks.ca.gov/egrams_ohmvr/user/home.aspx

The public may provide electronic comments to CSNC by e-mailing both CSNC (Contact@SierraNevadaConservation) and copying (cc) the OHMVR Division at ohvinfo@parks.ca.gov. You may also send written comments, suggestions, or letters of support for the applications to CSNC at P.O. Box 603, Georgetown, CA 95634.

The Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation is a grassroots environmental organization dedicated to the protection of ecosystem values and the long-term sustainability of our natural resources for future generations.


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Sierra Sentinel – Winter 2018

Sierra Sentinel – Winter 2018

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Dear Friends,

Thanks to your generous support, it has been a productive year for CSNC’s restoration program.  Our tireless staff, AmeriCorps crew, and hard-working volunteers restored 110 sites this past season, including riparian areas, hill climbs, special botanical areas, and sensitive lava caps. Thirty-four volunteers contributed a total of 370 hours at 16 different volunteer events.

caleb and jessy

Jessy and Caleb, our 2017 Sierra Nevada AmericaCorps Partnership (SNAP) volunteers, “graduated” in September. Caleb is now pursuing his Wilderness EMT certificate. Jessy, who loves to climb, is working for a tree company. They were an amazing crew! Though sad to see them go, we are happy to have helped “jump-start” their careers. We wish them all the best as they move to their next opportunities.

benkaitlinmatttoby

We are happy to welcome Ben and Kaitlin, our new SNAP members, who joined us this fall. We are again inspired by these young people who have chosen to give an entire year in service to our country and Mother Earth. Please join us in giving them a warm welcome!

CSNC's 2017 Restoration Projects

Volunteers and crew take a break beside Traverse Creek
llegal ATV use was destroying rare plants and threatening cultural and riparian resources at the Traverse Creek Botanical Special Interest Area in Garden Valley. In June, CSNC’s crew and volunteers, using just handcarts, carried fifteen 8”x8”x4’ posts, 23 bags of ready mix, and assorted tools over a mile to install a sturdy barrier to ATV traffic.

We restored several sites in the Sopiago Creek watershed, including illegal dirt bike hill climbs that were contributing to the sedimentation of the creek. To keep vehicles out, the crew makes use of large logs, scavenged from near the project, using trailer and assorted come-alongs, griphoists, and chains.

Through the summer, we also completed a number of restoration projects in the Pilliken, Capps Creek, Silver Creek, Alder Creek, Elkins Flat/Gold Note areas. We monitored on much of the rest of the Eldorado National Forest, identifying future restoration needs. Our post-restoration monitoring shows an impressive success rate at effectively restricting additional illegal use and damage. Our goal is to erase all signs of the user-created routes to discourage continued use.

Forest Service budgets have decreased under the new administration and a hiring freeze has reduced staffing levels on the Eldorado National Forest. In response, CSNC is building a strong partnership with the professionals on the Forest to support continued restoration.

While much of our restoration work is made possible through grants, we still depend on donations from our members to fund daily operating expenses. You can make secure, monthly donations on CSNC’s website: SierraNevadaConservation.org. Monthly donations help us budget for those mundane but necessary expenses like office rent, utilities, and internet access. Of course, your annual donations are also very much appreciated. So please give generously!

In Loving Memory

billcenter

Our dear friend, mentor, supporter, and inspiration, Bill Center, died on September 18 of cancer. Bill was a force like none other in El Dorado County. As an environmental advocate, he helped found Friends of the River, American River Conservancy, and Sierra Nevada Alliance. Back in 1986, he provided guidance to founders of CSNC. Bill fought to protect our rivers. He was politically savvy and worked for decades to keep El Dorado County from becoming part of the Sacramento metropolis. He and Robin were generous supporters of CSNC; they provided us venues, auction gifts, and food and drink.

Bill was frequently our auctioneer at events. We spent many an evening together folding flyers and stuffing envelopes for various campaigns and events over the years. We will miss Bill greatly, and send our condolences to Robin and the entire family.

Save the Date 
Sunday, May 6, is our Encore de Mayo celebration, with auction, music, food and drinks. The event will be at Camp Lotus. Please plan to attend and bring your friends. We promise a fun time in a beautiful location.

On behalf of CSNC’s Board of Directors and our young, enthusiastic staff, I wish you a happy, healthy and prosperous 2018.

Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation

P.O. Box 603 Georgetown, CA 95634
Phone: 530-206-7061
www.SierraNevadaConservation.org
contact@sierranevadaconservation.org
Meet our New AmeriCorps Members

Meet our New AmeriCorps Members

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Meet our new AmeriCorps members Ben and Kaitlin! Ben and Kaitlin will continue the great work of our AmeriCorps alumni protecting ecosystem values and the long-term sustainability of our natural resources for future generations.

Jensen-e1506620096442

Ben grew up in the suburbs of Long Island, New York, where sailing and trips to the Catskill Mountains dominated his summers and ski trips around New England filled his winters. He received a B.S. in Wildlife Biology with a minor in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism from the University of Vermont in hopes of blending his desire to work with animals and be outside as much as possible. Following graduation, he helped manage inventory for an outdoor gear retailer. Most recently, he has sailed in a transatlantic race from Portugal to Bermuda, hiked for three weeks on the Appalachian Trail, and spent time backpacking and climbing in Desolation Wilderness. Ben fell in love with the unique beauty of the Sierra Nevada and is excited to explore more of the range through time with the Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation and on his own. When not backpacking, Ben can be found mountain biking, backcountry skiing, and continuously searching for the world’s best chicken wings.

Raven

Kaitlin grew up on the south side of Chicago in the suburb of Frankfort, IL. She spent her summers growing up camping, fishing, and hiking with her family. Most of her adventures outdoors as a kid were with her grandfather, who had been a member in the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps). He was a major influence in her love for the outdoors and conservation. Her mother also encouraged her curiosity for nature by allowing her to do home experiments and also visit the Brookfield Zoo to learn about the animals almost every weekend of summer. Because of this, Kaitlin then went on to study at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida. She graduated in 2016 with a B.S. in Environmental Studies. While at Florida State she got to study a wide variety of environmental topics from marine megafauna and coral reef ecology to urban planning and demographics. Following graduation she moved across the country to Tucson, Arizona where she interned at Saguaro National Park. There she mostly worked on invasive vegetation management but also got to aid on projects such as Gila monster tracking, Saguaro census, pit tagging for tracking lesser long nose bats, and surveying. Although the desert was beautiful and amazing she moved yet again to New Hampshire to work for the SCA NH Americorps residential corps. There she got to teach environmental education in the winter and work on trail and conservation projects in the summer. Some highlights include chainsawing for 11 days to create brook trout habitat in Nash stream with Trout Unlimited ; and hiking, camping and working on the Appalachian Trail creating bog bridges and improving trail in the backcountry. Kaitlin was excited to travel back across the country to Placerville, CA to work as a Restoration Technician/Stewardship Assistant for the Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation. She cannot wait for the adventures to come this year and is excited for all the new places and faces she will encounter. When Kaitlin isn’t busy exploring the great outdoors you can catch her watching the Seminoles football games, trying new foods, traveling to a new place or watching the newest episodes of Game of Thrones.

Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation

P.O. Box 603 Georgetown, CA 95634

Phone: 530-206-7061

MLK Day of Service

MLK Day of Service

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Sierra Nevada Ensatina Salamander

MLK Day of Service

Thank you to all our volunteers who came out on MLK Day for our first restoration volunteer event of the New Year! We had a blast in the North Fork Cosumnes watershed restoring habitat just above Big Canyon Creek. Our awesome volunteers amazingly ripped a quarter of an acre of soil by hand and scattered duff and woody debris down the entire unauthorized OHV route. We also had the opportunity to transplant seedlings to encourage vegetation growth and improve water infiltration into the soil. We even saw a beautiful Sierra Nevada Ensatina Salamander! We could not have asked for a more fun and successful day of restoration! Special thanks to Bre and Liz, SNAP members from UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center who drove down for the day just to volunteer with us!
Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation 
P.O. Box 603 Georgetown, CA 95634
Phone: 530-206-7061
Thank you Volunteers!

Thank you Volunteers!

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All of us at The Center for Sierra Nevada Conservation had a great time at our volunteer appreciation dinner at Round Table Pizza on Thursday night! Our volunteers play a very important part in our restoration efforts, and we wanted to show them how thankful we are.

Our top volunteers this year were Jane Reed, Marty Oberlander, Loyd Evans, and Mae Harms!

Without those who sacrifice their time to join us in the forest restoring and protecting sensitive habitats, our jobs would be much harder. We hope you can join us at a volunteer event during our 2017/2018 restoration season!

Another great day in the forest!

Another great day in the forest!

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We had an excellent volunteer restoration day last Wednesday – the last one with Jessy and Caleb as our AmeriCorps members! Our new members will start November 1st!

We worked on a site that would have taken the restoration team alone several days to complete, but with the help of our awesome volunteers we got the majority of it done in just a few hours! As always, they exceeded our expectations and got the rills filled and most of the route duffed in record time.

Thank you to everyone who came out to work with us on Wednesday and throughout the year!

One day, two sites!

One day, two sites!

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The CSNC crew and volunteers headed out to Omo Ranch today to shut down and restore two unauthorized OHV trails in the Eldorado National Forest.

Despite the heat, everyone really worked hard to get these sites done!

In addition to the main large woody debris exclusions at the entrances to both sites, our volunteers helped cover bare ground with duff and throw debris on the tracks to make them even less accessible.
Thanks to our awesome volunteers, we got the restoration done in record time and were able to head over to the creek to cool off at the end of the day!

CSNC will be holding another volunteer watershed restoration work day on Wednesday, September 6th. If you couldn’t make it out with us today, we hope you can join us next time!

Our work at Sopiago continues!

Our work at Sopiago continues!

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The CSNC crew and volunteers continued restoration work at Sopiago Creek today, shutting down an illegal hill climb route. Along with previously placed exclusions and waterbars, we filled the rills and duffed and disguised the route. 

Our volunteers always exceed our expectations, but today they really dominated the duffing! We got our site done more quickly than we thought possible and were able to have a nice long lunch cooling of by the creek.

A big thank you to all those who came to Sopiago today! We still have more work to do in the area and can use all the help we can get! If you couldn’t make it out this time, we hope you can join us for our next restoration day!

Organizing to Protect our Public Lands

Organizing to Protect our Public Lands

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ORGANIZING TO PROTECT OUR PUBLIC LANDS


 

A workshop w/ the Center for Biological Diversity

Thursday, July 20th – 7pm to 9pm

Cameron Park Community Center (Social Room)
2502 Country Club Drive, Cameron Park

Organizing to Protect Our Public Lands

A workshop w/ the Center for Biological Diversity
“It is an American right to roam in our public lands. The people of the United States, today and tomorrow, share equally in the ownership of these majestic places. This powerful idea transcends party lines and sets our country apart from the rest of the world. That is why we strongly oppose any proposal, current or future, that devalues or compromises the integrity of our national public lands.”
From a Press Release by REI – February 2017

 

Public lands – our National Forests, Monuments, Parks and more – are under siege by a growing number of political and economic interests. These powerful forces wish to eliminate existing environmental protections and sell off these publicly owned lands to the highest bidder.

Without an organized and effective opposition to these efforts, the threats may become a sobering reality. And if we wait too long, it will be too late to mount an effective resistance.

The Center for Biological Diversity has pinpointed a number of Congressional Districts around the country whose representatives have aligned themselves with the “public lands seizures” movement. Our own Dist 4’s rep, Tom McClintock (R) ranks as #14 on the “Public Land Enemies” list compiled by the Center.

Ryan Beam, Public Lands Campaigner for the Center for Biological Diversity, is coming to El Dorado County to conduct a workshop on how we can organize effective opposition to protect and defend our public lands (he’ll also be in Sonora/Jackson the following Monday, July 24th):

  • America’s Public Lands – what are they and why should we care?
  • What is the “public land seizure” movement and who are its members and political/corporate allies?
  • What is McClintock’s role and what bills are being introduced on the Federal level to take away our public lands?
  • How do we organize to oppose these threats and protect our public lands for generations to come?

Almost 50% of the lands in El Dorado County are public lands! We live in the heart of a region with tens of thousands of residents who depend on public lands for recreation, livelihood, scientific research and study, and general enjoyment of living within and next to thriving public lands and habitat, replete with both our native flora and fauna.

If we can mobilize around the defense of everyone’s right to use and enjoy these lands (and not solely for the profit of corporations), we will be able to protect these lands for future generations, and make a significant impact on what happens (or doesn’t happen) on these lands.

This is not a “Red” or “Blue” issue; this is an issue for all us who enjoy and live near these precious national and natural treasures, treasures of untold floral and faunal riches.

This is too important a moment to ignore. The threats are real, the stakes too high.

This two-hour workshop is free. Organizing to Protect Our Public Lands Workshop is at the Cameron Park Community Center, 2502 Country Club Drive in Cameron Park, Thursday, July 20th, 7pm to 9pm. We ask that you pre-register to ensure we have sufficient space for all those who wish to attend.

For registration or questions: publiclandsworkshop@gmail.com or call 530-748-9365.


This event is being co-sponsored by the Center for Biological Diversity, El Dorado Progressives, and the El Dorado Chapter of the California Native Plant Society.

All photos: (c) 2017 Tripp Mikich
Top to Bottom: Indian Valley, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; South Fork of the American River, Coloma; Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; Granite Chief Wilderness, Tahoe National Forest.